dojo-learning

Just

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"Just post to an iframe," he says.

It's the "just" part that gets me.

I can't recall the last time I bought a technical book and, upon delivery, started at page one and read until the end of the book.

Well, that's not true. The last time was last week. But BEFORE that, it was, uh, never?

I tried to read Mastering Dojo, as it was available in PDF form as the book was being written and edited. I had problems with it, though. I don't know if the layout was problematic, the medium was problematic (reading a PDF for hours? Not quite able to do that yet.), or if the book itself was problematic for me and not organized in a way that worked for me. Regardless, I was unable to get through the book.

So, when Dojo: The Definitive Guide arrived on my doorstep, I opened it and started reading. That three of the first four confirmed errata for the book are mine, I think I was doing okay in getting through the book (with another number of "unconfirmed" errata). I took the book everywhere, including Andy's over the 4th of July, which I think may have annoyed him when I slipped away from the social events to go read. I finished it, and have to say, it's a good book. I finally (FINALLY) understand what the heck people are talking about in #dojo.

That's saying something.

With my new-found knowledge, I launched into one of my tasks at hand: AJAXifying the Drupal comment form so that comment form submissions aren't redirected to another page when replying to a previous comment.

I managed to adjust the form so that the comment form moves to the correct place for replying to a comment, and the submit happens correctly (with only minor Drupal Forms API manipulations, I'm pleased to say).

The next step (you know, the one before code review when my first Dojo script is ripped to shreds, and made so much better that one would wonder if it was still my code, which it wouldn't be, but that's okay because I would have learned much in the shredding, the "much" being what I want to learn, so it's all good) is to have the form submit on the same page. Partial page rendering, Kris says. PPR, which Oracle has been doing for almost a decade now.

Yeah.

So, just a form submit to an iframe.

Sleeves rolled up?

Good.

Go.